KathaVarta.com: for Short and Moral stories

Posts Tagged ‘Moral’

Who is Buddha?

Posted by kathavarta on February 12, 2009

There is a story told about the Buddha shortly after he was enlightened. As he was walking down the dusty road he met a traveller who saw him as a handsome yogi exuding a remarkable energy.

The traveller asked him, “You seem very special. What are you? Are you some kind of an Angel or Deva? You seem unhuman.”

“No,” Buddha said.

“Well, are you some kind of wizard or megician?” traveller asked.

“No,” Buddha replied.

“Well, are you a man?” traveller is now more curious.

“No,” Buddha replied with light smile.

“Then what are you?” tired and curious traveller is now littlebit frustrated.

At this the Buddha answered, “I am awake.”

In those three words – “I am awake” – he gave the whole of Buddist teachings.

The word “Buddha” means one who is awake. To be a Buddha is to be one who has awakened to the nature of life and death, and awakened and freed our compassion in the midst of this world.
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Posted in Buddhism, Fables, Katha, Moral story, Varta, Zen story | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Story: The Mayonnaise Jar

Posted by kathavarta on December 25, 2008

Hello Readers,

KathaVarta.org is always love to give and pass the Gem of the words from all the world to you and for your Good life. Today is a Christmas day and KathaVarta.org is pleased to pass below wonderful Varta (Story) to all of you, please enjoy and pass to others.

When things in your life seem Almost too much to handle, When 24 Hours a day is not enough, Remember the mayonnaise jar And 2 cups of coffee.

A professor stood before his philosophy class And had some items in front of him When the class began, wordlessly, He picked up a very large and Empty mayonnaise jar And proceeded to fill it with golf balls.

He then asked the students If the jar was full. They agreed that it was. The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls.

He then asked The students again If the jar was full, They agreed it was. The professor next picked up a box of sand And poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else.

He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “yes.”

The professor then produced Two cups of coffee from under the table And poured the entire contents Into the jar, effectively Filling the Empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

“Now,” said the professor, As the laughter subsided, “I want you to recognize that This jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things- God, family, children, health, friends, and favorite passions- Things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter Like your job, house, and car. The sand is everything else- The small stuff.”

“If you put the sand into the jar first,” He continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time And energy on the small stuff, You will never have room for the things that are Important to you. So- Pay attention to the things That is critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time To clean the house And fix the disposal. Take care of the golf balls first- The things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

One of the students raised her hand And inquired what the coffee represented. The professor smiled, “I’m glad you asked.”

It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, There’s always room For a couple of cups of coffee with a friend.”
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Posted in Buddhism, Children story, Hindu story, Jainism, Katha, Moral story, Sikhism, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Hypocrite

Posted by kathavarta on December 18, 2008

He who, restraining the organs of action,
sits thinking of the sense objects in mind,
he of deluded understanding is called a hypocrite.

- Bhagavad Gita Ch. 3, Verse 6

The five organs of action known as Karma Indriyas, are Vak (organ of speech), Pani (hands), Padam (feet), Upastha (genital), and Guda (anus). They are born of the Rajasic portion of the five tanmatras or subtle elements.

Vak (speech) from the akasha tanmatra (space), Pani (hands) from the vayu tanmatra (air), Padam (feet) from the agni tanmatra (fire), Upasthan (genital) from Aapas tanmatra (water), and Guda (anus) from the prithivi tanmatra (earth).

That man who, restraining the organs of action, sits revolving in his mind, thoughts regarding the objects of the senses is a man of sinful conduct. He is self-deluded. He is a veritable hypocrite.

The organs of action must be controlled. The thoughts should also be controlled. The mind should be firmly fixed on the Lord. Only then will you become a true Yogi. Only then will you attain to Self-realisation.

-Swami Shivananda, The Divine Life Society, Rishikesh.

Let us understand this ‘hypocrite’ word more from below story.

Story of two Brahmacharis

In the olden days, a young woman was living with her 3-year-old son in a house near the banks of a river. In the hot summer season the waters of the river had receded and people would walk across knee-deep waters to cross the river. The woman left her house and went across the river to gather some wood from the countryside. When she came back to the river, to her horror, she saw the river in floods. Lots of heavy rains in the mountain regions caused the waters to make the river swell with water. The woman was worried about her 3-year-old son. He could wander around to the rapidly flowing waters of the river and can drown. The mother was getting hysterical with fear and worry.

Just then two young and well built Brahmacharis (celibate students) were passing by and the mother, crying and begging, asked the Brahmacharis to help her go across the river. She told them about her 3-year-old son left alone to play by the house.

The Brahmacharis remembered the strict rules that they should not touch any female, lest that could arouse desires. That they should not be in the company of any females.

One Brahmachari whose name was Harshananda, reminded himself of the strict rules and said he cannot help the young woman. The other Brahmachari whose name was Devananda, immediately carried the mother on his shoulders and started swimming across the strong currents of the river. He safely delivered the mother to the other side of the river and swam back.

The Brahmacharis resumed their journey towards the Ashram where they were staying with their Guru. Harshananda, who refused to help could not believe the breach of the strict regulations and was constantly harping on it, muttering and thinking about it all the way.

When they reached the Ashram, the Guru asked them how their day went. The irritated Brahmachari Harshananda immediately spoke out in strong condemnation about the behaviour of his companion. Then the Guru asked the other Brahmachari.

Devananda said: I carried the mother across the river and forgot all about it but it seems my friend is still carrying the woman in his mind.

The Guru was pleased with Devananda who used his discrimination and helped the mother and spoke about the true meaning of hypocrisy as taught in the Bhagavad Gita.

From ‘Dipika’ A publication by Sri Ramakrishna Centre of South Africa; on http://hinduism.co.za
Visit www.eTirth.com for more religious information
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Posted in Buddhism, Hindu story, Jainism, Katha, Moral story, Religious, Sikhism, Story for Adult, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fox and the Cat

Posted by kathavarta on December 7, 2008

A Fox was boasting to a Cat of its clever devices for escaping its enemies.

“I have a whole bag of tricks,” he said, “which contains a hundred ways of escaping my enemies.”

“I have only one,” said the Cat; “but I can generally manage with that.”

Just at that moment they heard the cry of a pack of hounds coming towards them, and the Cat immediately scampered up a tree and hid herself in the boughs.

“This is my plan,” said the Cat. “What are you going to do?”

The Fox thought first of one way, then of another, and while he was debating the hounds came nearer and nearer, and at last the Fox in his confusion was caught up by the hounds and soon killed by the huntsmen.

Miss Puss, who had been looking on, said:

Moral:
“Better one safe way than a hundred on which you cannot reckon.”
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fox and the Bramble

Posted by kathavarta on December 6, 2008

A Fox was mounting a hedge when he lost his footing and caught hold of a Bramble to save himself.

Having pricked and grievously tom the soles of his feet, he accused the Bramble because, when he had fled to her for assistance, she had used him worse than the hedge itself.

The Bramble, interrupting him, said, “But you really must have been out of your senses to fasten yourself on me, who am myself always accustomed to fasten upon others.”

Moral:
To the selfish all are selfish.
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Fishermen

Posted by kathavarta on November 29, 2008

Some Fishermen were out trawling their nets. Perceiving them to be very heavy, they danced about for joy and supposed that they had taken a large catch.

When they had dragged the nets to the shore they found but few fish: the nets were full of sand and stones, and the men were beyond measure cast downso much at the disappointment which had befallen them, but because they had formed such very different expectations.

One of their company, an old man, said, “Let us cease lamenting, my mates, for, as it seems to me, sorrow is always the twin sister of joy; and it was only to be looked for that we, who just now were over-rejoiced, should next have something to make us sad.”

Moral:
Sorrow is always the twin sister of Joy.
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Posted in Aesop Fable, Children story, Fables, Moral story, Varta | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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